film studies info.png

Film Studies A Level

This course is for anyone who has a keen interest in Film and wants to understand how the film industry works, how to analyse films, how to make films, and how films ‘work’ for audiences. Film is essentially an optical illusion, and yet we react very strongly to it, expressing laughter, fear, shock and happiness; and the emotions which films can generate often remain strong in our memory. We know it’s not real, and yet we react as if it is real. How do films manage to have such an effect on us?

Why do audiences identify with characters? How does the film industry design films which attract certain audiences?

This course will be of interest to anyone who enjoys the cinema but wants to know far more about the aesthetic qualities of film: the narrative structure, and the use of cinematography, editing, light and sound, and how all these different elements combine to create meaning and generate a strong emotional response.

This course will also be of interest to anyone who wants to develop their skills of analysis and learn to think critically. Film Studies is a subject intended for those who like to become involved and learn through active participation. Lastly, for all these reasons, Film Studies complements a range of other subjects very well, such as English Literature, Media Studies, Psychology, Sociology, and Art and Design.

+ Course details and future career paths

Component 01 – Film History: (2.5 hour exam – 35% of A Level qualification).

This component assesses knowledge and understanding of six feature-length films.

Section A: Hollywood 1930-1990 (comparative study) One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to two Hollywood films, one from the Classical Hollywood period (1930-1960) and the other from the New Hollywood period (1961-1990). Focal films may include: Vertigo (Hitchcock ,1958), and Bladerunner (Scott, 1982).

Section B: American film since 2005 (two-film study) One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to two American films, one mainstream film and one contemporary independent film. Focal films may include: La La Land (Chazelle ,2016), and Boyhood (Linklater, 2015)

Section C: British film since 1995 (two-film study) One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to two British films. Focal films may include: Sightseers (Wheatley 2012) and Under the Skin (Glazer 2013).

Component 02 – Critical Approaches to Film (2.5 hour exam – 35% of A Level qualification) This component assesses knowledge and understanding of five feature-length films (or their equivalent).

Section A: Global film (two-film study) One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to two global films: one European and one produced outside Europe. Focal films: Pan’s Labyrinth (del Toro , Spain, 2006) and City of God (Mereilles, Brazil, 2002).

Section B: Documentary film One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to one documentary film. Focal film: Amy (Kapadia, UK, 2015)

Section C: Film movements – Silent cinema One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to one silent film or group of films. Focal film: Sunrise (Murnau, US, 1927)

Section D: Film movements – Experimental film (1960-2000) One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to one film option. Focal Film: Pulp Fiction (Tarantino, US, 1994) .

Component 03 – Production (Non-Examined Assessment for Y1 and Y2 Film Studies—30% of A Level qualification).

This component assesses one production and its evaluative analysis. Learners will spend 7 weeks working on the Production component in both Y1 and Y2 to ensure the highest possible quality of work.

Learners produce:– either a short film (4-5 minutes)– a screenplay for a short film (1600-1800 words) plus a digitally photographed storyboard of a key section from the screenplay– an evaluative analysis (1600 – 1800 words).

+ Progression

Film Studies A-level is particularly relevant for University courses in Film or Media Production, Creative Writing, Advertising and Marketing, Journalism or Teaching. Students going directly into employment after A-level Film Studies have skills suitable for PR, Marketing, creative administration or roles requiring strong communication skills e.g. youth or charity work.

 

How to find us.

Recreation Road
Durrington
Wilts
SP4 8HH

Phone: 01980 652 467
EMAIL: Admin@avonvalleycollege.org.uk

 
/* RANDOM GALLERY IMAGE */